Verbal and nonverbal communication techniques

Respect the personal space of your recruiter - Job Application Academy - Pauwels ConsultingA good preparation for a job interview is half the battle, but your performance during the interview is obviously critical to increase your chances of success. In this article we will discuss 10 tips for a good job interview. The focus will be on the importance of verbal and nonverbal communication.

There is more to it than meets… the ear!

Scientific research shows that our communication is primarily determined by nonverbal communication! What we say and how we say it is important, but our body language is possibly even more important. So during a job interview you will need to pay attention to your verbal and your nonverbal communication.

5 Tips for nonverbal communication during job interviews

  • Hello there!
    The first impression is important. Very important! So start your job interview with a confident handshake and nod to your recruiter’s colleagues. This will give you an immediate advantage.
  • Physical care and clothing

    It may sound obvious, but make sure you are looking good and clean. Avoid unpleasant odours like smoke and sweat, make sure your hands are clean and that your hair is not in a mess. A good candidate takes good care of himself or herself.

    Start thinking about your ‘stage outfit’ a few days before your interview. This way you will have enough time to shine on stage without any additional stress. Choose an outfit that looks good, corresponds to the dress code and makes you feel good.

    Allow plenty of travel time! This way you will not need to run and sweat. Don’t smoke prior to your job interview and put a bottle of deodorant and a brush or comb in your bag. These are details that can make a huge difference.

  • Be confident!

    During your job interview try to sit upright with your back against the backrest of your seat. And try to make direct eye contact. Don’t stare or look around all the time. Make sure you are giving the impression that you are alert and interested.

    Don’t sit out the entire job interview in the same position. This will harm the quality of the interview and it will hurt your your back! You can easily change your position by, for example, tilting your head to the right. Through this small movement you will subconsciously look reliable and professional.

  • Respect the personal space

    Respect the ‘personal space’ of the recruiter. You don’t need to convince the recruiter by leaning as close as possible against him or her. Make sure you are not sitting or standing closer than 1 m and not more than 3 meters away from your recruiter.

  • Don’t exaggerate!

    Ensure a balance between subtle movements and a ‘stiff’ posture. Try not to continuously wave your arms and hands throughout the job interview. This may be perceived as disturbing. The same applies to someone who is not moving at all.

    ‘Mirroring’ is a natural way of moving which lets you gain the trust of your recruiter. By imitating the movement of your recruiter in a subtle and natural manner (crossing legs, arms on the table, hand under the head…) you will indicate that you agree with the recruiter. This way you can make a subconscious ‘connection’.


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Q&A

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Why is it important to use a range of verbal and non-verbal communication strategies with young children? | Yahoo Answers

The short answer to your question is that children need to understand verbal communication and body language. I have a lot of fun with the body language in my class. Some strategies include pretending I'm interviewing for a job. I lean backward... what does that mean? I'm not very interested in the job. I lean forward... that shows I'm interested. I cross my arms... I'm not open to what the interviewer is saying. I have my hands folded on my lap... I'm in control. For verbal strategies, ones tone and volume are key. If I say "That's a nice shirt" in a sarcastic manner, the kids pick up…


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